Small seeds of hope can feed families

Small seeds of hope can feed families

Small seeds of hope can feed families

Small seeds of hope can feed families

Growing esteem: Belito João Njaze and Alcidio Benjamin (from JAM) are very proud of their efforts.

At a time when the world seems to be tilting from one disaster to another, it is the small seeds of hope that keep us grounded.

In Mozambique, these small seeds have grown into a thriving communal vegetable garden that gives father of seven, Belito João Njaze and his fellow farmer, Manuel Verniz, a great sense of accomplishment.

Manuel and Belito, who is also a community leader, in Mussapassua in the Muanza district of Sofala province, were part of the World Food Programme and JAM’s latest Food Assistance for Assets (FFA) project, which started in May.

The project, which saw 23 community groups issued with seeds, farming equipment and training, was launched in four localities of Muanza, chosen according to their needs after Cyclone Eloise destroyed homes, infrastructure, farming land and livelihoods in January.

The farmers said they did not expect these blooming results when they started building seedbeds earlier and are overjoyed.

“The support came when we didn’t know what to do because we had lost almost everything,” says Manuel, pointing to his bumper crop.

In neatly tended beds are rows of bright green lettuces, cabbages, onions, kale and tomatoes.

Alcidio Benjamin, JAM’s manager in Sofala, explains that plant varieties are especially chosen for their nutritional qualities and climate-smart techniques are taught for an environment where conditions are often harsh.

The project also included training on making compost and natural pesticides, how to store and take care of the produce once it is harvested and also how to go about collecting seeds for next season’s planting.

“Thank you JAM and WFP for bringing light and hope into our community. Today we have this group vegetable garden which will provide food for many families,” says Belito, whose group will also be able to sell any surplus produce for additional income.

“Empowering people to produce their own food has a real impact,” concludes Vimabanai Chakarisa, JAM’s programme quality and development manager.

Bumper crop

Bumper crop: Manuel Verniz’s hard work has paid off.

African innovation

Nature’s umbrellas and seed pods

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_custom_heading source="post_title" font_container="tag:h2|font_size:45|text_align:left" use_theme_fonts="yes"][vc_single_image image="37693" img_size="full" alignment="center" style="vc_box_shadow_border"...

Angola celebrates water

Angolan community celebrates the precious gift of water

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_custom_heading source="post_title" font_container="tag:h2|font_size:45|text_align:left" use_theme_fonts="yes"][vc_single_image image="37690" img_size="full" alignment="center" style="vc_box_shadow_border"...